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The Colorado Avalanche: News from around the NHL - February 5th, 2014

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Tom Pennington

Some journalists aren't enjoying themselves thoroughly in Russia, just yet. (There are pictures and numerous tweets)

Amid continued debate over whether or not Sochi is prepared to host the 2014 Olympics, which begins Thursday, reporters from around the world are starting to check into local hotels — to their apparent grief. Some journalists arriving in Sochi are describing appalling conditions in the housing there, where only six of nine media hotels are ready for guests. Hotels are still under construction. Water, if it’s running, isn’t drinkable. One German photographer told the AP over the weekend that his hotel still had stray dogs and construction workers wandering in and out of rooms.

Rogers knows Canadians love their hockey.

If you don’t like hockey, you may want to sell your TV this fall.

On Tuesday, Rogers unveiled its grand plans for the first year of its 12-year, $5.2-billion exclusive national broadcast deal it signed with the National Hockey League in late November. At a glance, there will be no shortage of NHL action to be found, no matter what your platform.

For starters, Saturday’s big night of hockey will get even bigger, with up to seven games being aired, instead of the usual two to four now seen on CBC. Rogers will employ 13 networks to show NHL action on Saturdays, including the Rogers regional channels, City and CBC.

Tie Domi will be releasing a memoir.

Former Toronto Maple Leafs enforcer Tie Domi is stickhandling another role away from the ice: author.

Simon & Schuster Canada announced on Tuesday that it will publish Domi’s forthcoming memoir.

The ex-NHLer will co-write the book with sports reporter Jim Lang.

The as yet untitled memoir is due for release in the fall of 2015.

The book will document Domi’s career and experiences beyond the rink, and look at his life after professional hockey since his 2006 retirement.